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COQ10

Ubiquinol has been studied for a number of chronic and even genetic diseases such as Down Syndrome. A hallmark of Down Syndrome is a high oxidative state. Studies conducted at a children's hospital in Cincinnati found that ubiquinol was able to bring 80 percent of children with Down's back to normal oxidative levels within a month or so. This did not occur with conventional CoQ10, nor any other therapeutic antioxidant supplements.

This is the study info:

Coenzyme Q10 (ubiquinol-10) supplementation improves oxidative imbalance in children with trisomy 21. Pediatr Neurol. 2007.

Evidence of oxidative stress was reported in individuals with trisomy 21. In this study, 14 children with trisomy 21 had significantly increased plasma ubiquinone-10 (the oxidized component of coenzyme Q10) compared with 12 age- and sex-matched healthy children. After 3 months of ubiquinol-10 supplementation (10 mg/kg/day) to 10 patients with trisomy 21, the mean ubiquinol-10:total coenzyme Q10 ratio increased significantly. To our knowledge, this is the first study to indicate that the pro-oxidant state in plasma of children with trisomy 21, as assessed by ubiquinol-10:total coenzyme Q10 ratio, may be normalized with ubiquinol-10 supplementation. Further studies are needed to determine whether correction of this oxidant imbalance improves clinical outcomes of children with trisomy 21.  

Source: Mercola

Slowing Neurodegenerative Disease Progression

Many investigators have conducted preclinical studies examining how oxidative stress and impaired mitochondrial function may contribute to neuronal cell death, a characteristic of Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s, and other neurodegenerative diseases.  For example, a recent journal article in Toxicology and Applied Pharmacologyreported on the effects of the herbicide paraquat on neuronal cell death in the laboratory.  The researchers found that this toxic chemical damaged mitochondria and increased free radical production, eventually resulting in the death of neuronal cells. Pretreatment of the cell cultures with CoQ10, however, inhibited both mitochondrial dysfunction and free radical generation.  The researchers postulated that coenzyme Q10 may prove useful in preventing and treating neurodegenerative conditions related to environmental toxins.

While published research on the use of CoQ10 in slowing the progression of Alzheimer’s disease has been limited to preclinical studies, investigations of CoQ10 and Parkinson’s disease have moved into clinical trials, including randomized controlled studies. This work has been led by Clifford Shults, MD, professor of neurosciences at the University of California at San Diego School of Medicine. In Parkinson’s disease, brain cells that produce the neurotransmitter dopamine progressively die. Research in animals has shown that CoQ10 can protect the substantia nigra, the area of the brain where these cells reside. Studies by Dr. Shults and others have shown that mitochondrial dysfunction and diminished mitochondrial CoQ10 levels frequently occur in Parkinson’s sufferers.

Source: Life Extension

There is some debate around the use of Ubiquinol and Ubiquinone (COQ10), as to whether one is superior over the other. Ubiquinol does appear to have one advantage. It is more bioavailable than the dry powdered forms of ubiquinone.  Ubiquinol is the more expensive form.  Nutrivene contains COQ10 in the Ubiquinone form.  This link talks about this further.

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